Lentonness Relaunch

Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad's public artwork finds a new home at Crocus Café

When

5th March 2021

What time

All day

Location

Crocus Café

18 Lenton Boulevard

NG7 2ES

Cost

Free

We’re pleased to announce the relaunch of Lentonness by Near Now Fellow Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad and Lenton Residents at Crocus Café.

Lentonness is a public artwork, taking the form of an LED sign, that features definitions of Lenton gathered from local residents: a growing list of experiences, observations and characteristics of the neighbourhood.

The artwork launched in 2019 and was designed to keep on evolving — with new definitions added to the original responses, and the sign touring to different local venues.

Crocus Café is Nottingham’s oldest community café. It’s not-for-profit, affordable, vegetarian and vegan with a focus on being fair trade and locally sourced. The café is currently closed, but you can walk past at any time to view the artwork. Look out for updates when the café can reopen.

Photo by Reece Straw

Photo by Reece Straw

Making Place

As part of Primary's Making Place programme, Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad ran workshops with Lenton residents, sharing stories, images, and myths about the local area. Through this process, the group distilled a question to ask the wider public in the area: "What is Lentonness?"

The responses gathered so far featured in a public artwork taking the form of an LED sign, that was displayed on the side of the Savoy Cinema from 2019–2020. The different definitions give a rich picture of the many things that Lenton means to local people – from long-term residents, elders and children, to new communities and students – at a time when the neighbourhood has undergone significant changes. They offer snapshots of place, memories, humour, poetry, loss and hope.


Lentonness was commissioned by Primary as part of the Making Place programme, and was produced in partnership with Broadway's Near Now, supported using public funding by Arts Council England. The project was supported by Near Neighbours and the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation.

Photo by Reece Straw

Photo by Reece Straw